Planetary Myths

Moons of Our Solar System This photo illustration shows selected moons of our solar system at their correct relative sizes to each other and to Earth. Pictured are Earth's Moon; Jupiter's Callisto, Ganymede, Io and Europa; Saturn's Iapetus, Enceladus, Titan, Rhea, Mimas, Dione and Tethys; Neptune's Triton; Uranus' Miranda, Titania and Oberon and Pluto's Charon. Credit: NASA
Moons of Our Solar System
This photo illustration shows selected moons of our solar system at their correct relative sizes to each other and to Earth.
Pictured are Earth’s Moon; Jupiter’s Callisto, Ganymede, Io and Europa; Saturn’s Iapetus, Enceladus, Titan, Rhea, Mimas, Dione and Tethys; Neptune’s Triton; Uranus’ Miranda, Titania and Oberon and Pluto’s Charon.
Credit: NASA

Those who name the planets and dwarves try to make the names of their moons relevant to the ancient mythology of Greece and Rome. Some of the figures picked and relationships are strained, but in this portfolio, I intend to explore the relationship between the planets and their main satellites, starting with our former ninth planet, which has been demoted to dwarf status — Pluto.

Jupiter

Mars

Neptune

Uranus

Here is NASA’s complete list:

Earth
1. Earth’s Moon

Mars
2. Phobos
3. Deimos

Jupiter
4. Io
5. Europa
6. Ganymede
7. Callisto
8. Amalthea
9. Himalia
10. Elara
11. Pasiphae
12. Sinope
13. Lysithea
14. Carme
15. Ananke
16. Leda
17. Thebe
18. Adrastea
19. Metis
20. Callirrhoe
21. Themisto
22. Megaclite
23. Taygete
24. Chaldene
25. Harpalyke
26. Kalyke
27. Iocaste
28. Erinome
29. Isonoe
30. Praxidike
31. Autonoe
32. Thyone
33. Hermippe
34. Aitne
35. Eurydome
36. Euanthe
37. Euporie
38. Orthosie
39. Sponde
40. Kale
41. Pasithee
42. Hegemone
43. Mneme
44. Aoede
45. Thelxinoe
46. Arche
47. Kallichore
48. Helike
49. Carpo
50. Eukelade
51. Cyllene
52. Kore
53. Herse

Saturn (the original moons were named after Titans and Giants, children of Ouranos and Gaia, like Cronus/Saturn, but as more moons were found the list of Titans/Giants was exhausted.  Other characters from Greek mythology were added, like Prometheus’ sister-in-law Pandora, and then creatures, especially giants, from other mythologies.)
54. Mimas
55. Enceladus
56. Tethys
57. Dione
58. Rhea
59. Titan
60. Hyperion
61. Iapetus
62. Erriapus
63. Phoebe
64. Janus
65. Epimetheus
66. Helene
67. Telesto
68. Calypso
69. Kiviuq
70. Atlas
71. Prometheus
72. Pandora
73. Pan
74. Ymir
75. Paaliaq
76. Tarvos
77. Ijiraq
78. Suttungr
79. Mundilfari
80. Albiorix
81. Skathi
82. Siarnaq
83. Thrymr
84. Narvi
85. Methone
86. Pallene
87. Polydeuces
88. Daphnis
89. Aegir
90. Bebhionn
91. Bergelmir
92. Bestla
93. Farbauti
94. Fenrir
95. Fornjot
96. Hati
97. Hyrrokkin
98. Kari
99. Loge
100. Skoll
101. Surtur
102. Greip
103. Jarnsaxa
104. Tarqeq
105. Anthe
106. Aegaeon

Uranus
107. Cordelia
108. Ophelia
109. Bianca
110. Cressida
111. Desdemona
112. Juliet
113. Portia
114. Rosalind
115. Mab
116. Belinda
117. Perdita
118. Puck
119. Cupid
120. Miranda
121. Francisco
122. Ariel
123. Umbriel
124. Titania
125. Oberon
126. Caliban
127. Stephano
128. Trinculo
129. Sycorax
130. Margaret
131. Prospero
132. Setebos
133. Ferdinand

Neptune
134. Triton
135. Nereid
136. Naiad
137. Thalassa
138. Despina
139. Galatea
140. Larissa
141. Proteus
142. Halimede
143. Psamathe
144. Sao
145. Laomedeia
146. Neso

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